Wollongong University Dubai

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Wollongong University Dubai

Postby shawarma » 03 Dec 2007, 11:49

University of Wollongong Dubai - information on Dubai FAQs.
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Wollongong Dubai founder James Langridge

Postby shawarma » 03 Dec 2007, 11:51

Some background on James Langridge who founded University of Wollongong in Dubai in 1993, and a few comments from him about the university and where it's at.

From ET 23 Dec 2006...

As an Australian, vice-principal and founder of the University of Wollongong in Dubai (UOWD) James Langridge believes it is vitally important that relations between his country and the UAE remain strong and get stronger.

That is why Australian Prime Minister John Howard appointed Langridge to be part of the 12-strong Council of Australian-Arab Relations (CAAR). Langridge, a distinguished businessman, has been coming to Dubai since 1991 and was inspirational in bringing Australia’s top university to the UAE.

As well as this and his position on the Council, Langridge is also the director of Illawarra Technology Corporation; director, UOWD Board of Trustees; director of IDP Education Australia Board; and Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

“There are 18,000 Aus tralians working in Dubai, so it is important that relations are kept healthy – both internationally and internally,” he said. “As a member of CAAR and also a resident in the UAE, I have particular insight as to what is happening in the Middle East, and I am usually invited on the Australian Government delegations to the region.” Langridge is also member of the board of Al Jazeera Academy Board in Qatar that has opened 12 schools there, and he believes this is one of the reasons he was appointed as a member of CAAR.

“It’s still early days, but I see it as a council to further Australian relations in what is becoming an increasingly important part of the world,” he acknowledged. “Not just because of the immigration between the two, but because of the rise in trade,” he said.

The council is made up of 50 per cent native Australians and 50 per cent Arabs who hold regular meetings on the roles and needs of the society as a whole.

Langridge said the riots that happened in the coastal city of Sydney in December 2005 were an exceptional case and did not represent how Australians should be perceived.

“Australia is a very multicultural society and like every society, it has a minority who believe their way is the only way for a community to develop,” said Langridge about the incidents. “Regrettably, you get an occasional flashpoint like the one last year, but it is not the representation of a whole country.” Langridge said that since the University of Wollongong’s accreditation of all its courses in late 2004, one of the things he is most proud of is the interest and enrolment of hundreds of UAE nationals on courses in the Dubai centre.

“This has been one of the notable successes at the university and one which we will continue to nurture,” he said. “We have created an institute where students feel comfortable staying in their own country and confident of the standard of teaching they receive.” The university was established in 1993, and is one of Dubai’s oldest universities with around 2,500 students.

A total of 610 students graduated from the university last week, of which more than 40 were UAE nationals.

Langridge believes that the UOWD offers the same standard of education as its New South Wales counterpart in Australia. “We offer UAE nationals and expatriates alike the same excellent standard that students receive in the universities of Australia,” he said. “Because of the standing of the parent university, students in Dubai can proceed to any international university in the world with their qualifications from the University of Wollongong in Dubai.” But with 85 per cent of students at the university being non-native English speakers, there are some differences between the institute in Dubai and the one in Australia.

“The main difference in Dubai is that we have support facilities in the knowledge that English is not everybody’s native language,” he added. “We have many students from the UAE, other Gulf countries and Russia, all of whom have English as a second language.

“We will continue to develop their needs,” added James Langridge.
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